Kryx RPGThemesMonsters

Rules for concoctions, maneuvers, and spells

Concoctions use alchemical catalysts to create effects, maneuvers use a character’s stamina dice, and spells use a character’s magical power known as mana.

Concoctions

Concoctions are created by alchemical reactions which produce altering effects, deadly poisons and diseases, or great explosions.

Each made concoction and the glass and liquid materials to make a concoction weigh ¼ kg.

Concoctions are inherently short lived. If a concoction is not used or consumed within 24 hours of being created it loses its power. A character can expend resources to add preservative chemicals which make it last much longer as detailed on Alchemical Creations.

Catalysts

Every concoction has a catalyst cost from 1 to 5. The more catalysts a concoction is created with, the higher level a character must be to create that concoction.

A character cannot expend catalysts higher than their catalysts limit as outlined in the Catalysts Limit column of their class table. So when Spark, a 3rd-level Alchemist (Chemist), uses alchemical acid, a 1 catalyst concoction, he spends 1 catalyst and has 5 catalysts remaining.

Finishing a short or long rest restores some catalysts. See your class for more details.

Catalysts limit

Combining chemicals can be deadly. There is a limit on the number of catalysts you can spend to create a concoction. Thus, each class’ description includes a table showing how many catalysts a character has at each character level. For example Spark, a 5th-level Alchemist (Chemist), can spend no more than 2 catalysts on a concoction each time he creates it, no matter how many catalysts he has.

Augmenting

When a character creates a concoction using more catalysts than the concoction needs, the concoction assumes the higher catalyst for that creation. For instance Spark creates an invisibility potion using 2 catalysts, that invisibility potion is created as if it were a 2 catalyst concoction, following the details as specified in the augment section of the concoction.

If a concoction has multiple augmentations, choose one or combine them by spending the specified amount of catalysts for each augmentation.

Concoction created using 5 catalysts

Concoctions created using 5 catalysts are particularly taxing to create. Once you create a concoction using 5 catalysts, you can’t create another concoction using 5 catalysts until you finish a long rest.

Known Concoctions

Before a character can create a concoction, they must have extensive training with the concoction and have it firmly fixed in mind. The number of concoctions a character can have fixed in mind at any given time depends on the character’s level. Each class details how many concoctions a character can learn. Whenever a character learns a new concoction, the concoction must be from a theme they already know.

Whenever a character gains a level, they can choose one of the concoctions they know and replace it with another concoction from a theme they knows.

Maneuvers

Rather than standing still and trading blows, maneuvers allow each round to become a contest of strategy as each combatant delves into their repertoire of tricks to out-maneuver and ultimately defeat their opponent.

Stamina Dice

Every maneuver has a stamina dice cost from 1 to 5. The more stamina dice a maneuver uses the higher level a character must be to use the maneuver.

A character cannot expend more stamina dice than their dice limit as outlined in the Dice Limit column of their class table. So when Jutok, a 3rd-level Warrior, uses charge, a 1 stamina dice maneuver, he spends 1 stamina dice and has 5 stamina dice remaining.

Finishing a short or long rest restores some stamina dice. See your class for more details.

Some characters and monsters have special abilities that let them use a maneuvers without using stamina dice.

Dice limit

Maneuvers are physically and mentally taxing. There is a limit on the number of stamina dice you can spend to use a maneuver. Thus, each class’ description includes a table showing how many stamina dice a character has at each character level. For example Jutok, a 3rd-level Warrior, can spend no more than 1 stamina dice on a maneuver each time he uses it, no matter how many stamina dice he has.

Enhancing

When a character uses a maneuver using more stamina dice than the maneuver needs, the maneuver assumes the higher stamina dice for that casting. For instance Jutok uses spring attack using 2 stamina dice, that spring attack is used as if it were a 2 stamina dice maneuver, following the details as specified in the enhance section of the maneuver.

If a maneuver has multiple enhancements, choose one or combine them by spending the specified amount of stamina dice for each enhancement.

Known Maneuvers

Before a character can use a maneuver, they must have extensive training with the maneuver and have it firmly fixed in mind. The number of maneuvers a character can have fixed in mind at any given time depends on the character’s level. Each class details how many maneuvers a character can learn. Whenever a character learns a new maneuver, the maneuver must be from a theme they already know.

Whenever a character gains a level, they can choose one of the maneuvers they know and replace it with another maneuver from a theme they knows.

Spells

Magic permeates fantasy gaming worlds and often appears in the form of a spell. A spell is a discrete magical effect, a single shaping of the magical energies that suffuse the multiverse into a specific, limited expression. In casting a spell, a character carefully plucks at the invisible strands of raw magic suffusing the world, pins them in place in a particular pattern, sets them vibrating in a specific way, and then releases them to unleash the desired effect—in most cases, all in the span of seconds.

Spells can be versatile tools, weapons, or protective wards. They can deal damage or undo it, impose or remove conditions, drain life energy away, and restore life to the dead.

Uncounted thousands of spells have been created over the course of the multiverse’s history, and many of them are long forgotten. Some might yet lie recorded in crumbling spellbooks hidden in ancient ruins or trapped in the minds of dead gods. Or they might someday be reinvented by a character who has amassed enough power and wisdom to do so.

Mana

Every spell has a mana cost from 0 to 5. The more mana a spell uses the higher level a character must be to use the spell.

A character cannot expend more mana than their mana limit as outlined in the Mana Limit column of their class table. So when Umara, a 5th-level Mage (Wizard), uses fireball, a 2 mana spell, she spends 2 mana and has 6 mana remaining.

Finishing a short or long rest restores some mana. See your class for more details.

Some characters and monsters have special abilities that let them cast spells without using mana.

Mana limit

Manipulating the fabric of magic and channeling energy into even a simple effect is physically and mentally taxing, and more powerful effects are even more so. There is a limit on the amount of mana you can spend to cast a spell. Thus, each class’ description includes a table showing how much mana a character has at each character level. For example Umara, a 5th-level Mage (Wizard), can spend no more than 2 mana on a spell each time she uses it, no matter how much mana she has.

Augmenting

When a character casts a spell using more mana than the spell needs, the spell assumes the higher mana for that casting. For instance, if Umara casts magic missiles using 2 mana, that magic missiles is cast as if it were a 2 mana spell, following the details in the augment section of the spell.

If a spell has multiple augmentations, choose one or combine them by spending the specified amount of mana for each augmentation.

Spells cast using 5 or more mana or psi

Spells cast using 5 or more mana or psi are particularly taxing to cast. Once you cast a spell using 5 or more mana or psi, you can’t cast another spell using 5 or more mana or psi until you finish a long rest.

Known Spells

Before a character can cast a spell, they must have extensive training with the spell and have it firmly fixed in mind. The number of spells a character can have fixed in mind at any given time depends on the character’s level. Each class details how many spells a character can learn. Whenever a character learns a new spell, the spell must be from a theme they already know.

Whenever a character gains a level, they can choose one of the spells they know and replace it with another spell from a theme they knows.

Rituals

Certain spells have a special tag: ritual. Such a spell can be cast following the normal rules for spellcasting, or the spell can be cast as a ritual. The ritual version of a spell takes 10 minutes longer to cast than normal. It also doesn’t expend mana, which means the ritual version of a spell can’t be augmented.

To cast a spell as a ritual, a spellcaster must have a feature that grants the ability to do so. The Mage, for example, has such a feature. The caster must also have the spell on their list of spells known, unless the character’s ritual feature specifies otherwise, as the mage’s does.

Casting in Armor

Because of the mental focus and precise gestures required for spellcasting, you must be proficient with the armor you are wearing to cast a spell. You are otherwise too distracted and physically hampered by your armor for spellcasting.

Casting, creating, and using

When a character creates, casts, or uses any concoction, maneuver, or spell, the same basic rules are followed, regardless of the character’s class or the concoction, maneuver, or spell’s effects.

Multiple concoctions, maneuvers, or spells on a turn

On your turn, you cannot expend more catalysts than your catalyst limit, more mana than your mana limit, more psi than your psi limit, or more stamina dice than your dice limit. If you have multiple resources, you cannot spend a combined amount of catalysts, mana, psi, or stamina dice on your turn greater than your highest limit.

If you are able to create a concoction without expending catalysts, cast a spell without expending mana or psi, or use a maneuver without expending stamina dice, treat that usage as if it cost the normal amount of resources for this rule.

Casting time, creation time, and use time

Concoctions require one or two actions to create, maneuvers require an action or reaction to use, and most spells require one or two actions to cast. Some spells require a reaction, or much more time to cast.

Reactions

Some maneuvers or spells can be cast or used as reactions. These maneuvers and spells take a fraction of a second to bring about and are cast or used in response to some event. If a maneuver or spell can be cast or used as a reaction, the maneuver or spell description tells you exactly when you can do so.

Longer casting times

Certain spells require more time to cast or create: minutes or even hours. When you cast a spell with a casting time longer than a two actions, you must spend your actions each turn casting the spell, and you must maintain your concentration while you do so (see “Concentration” below). If your concentration is broken, the spell fails, but you don’t expend resources. If you want to try casting the spell again, you must start over.

Range

The target of a concoction is typically the drinker of a tonic or potion or a small burst for explosives. The target of a maneuver or spell must be within the maneuver or spell’s range. For a maneuver like knockback or a spell like magic missiles, the target is a creature. For a maneuver like volley or a spell like fireball, the target is the point in space where the projectiles fall or the ball of fire erupts.

Most thrown concoctions have a range of 5 meters. Most maneuvers have ranges based on the weapon that uses them. Most spells have ranges expressed in meters, typically 5, 10, 25, 100, and 200 meters. Some spells can target only a creature (including you) that you touch. Other maneuvers and spells, such as the parry maneuver or the shield spell, affect only you. These maneuvers and spells have a range of self.

Maneuvers and spells that create cones or lines of effect that originate from you also have a range of self, indicating that the origin point of the maneuver or spell’s effect must be you (see “Areas of Effect”).

Once a concoction is drank or thrown, a maneuver is used, or a spell is cast, its effects aren’t limited by its range, unless the concoction, maneuver, or spell’s description says otherwise.

Components

A spell’s components are the physical requirements you must meet in order to cast it. Each spell’s description indicates whether it requires material (M) components. If you can’t provide a spell’s material components, you are unable to cast the spell.

Material (M)

Some spells require a material item to cast them. The flavor of a material item is up the GM, though diamonds and other gems are often used. If a spell states that a material is consumed by the spell, the caster must provide this material for each casting of the spell.

Duration

A concoction, maneuver, or spell’s duration is the length of time the concoction, maneuver, or spell persists. A duration can be expressed in rounds, minutes, hours, or even years. If a concoction, maneuver, or spell specifies that its duration lasts an amount per resource used (1 minute/mana or psi for example), the duration is automatically increased the amount listed based on the amount of resources (catalysts, mana, psi, stamina dice) used. Some spells specify that their effects last until the spell is dispelled or destroyed.

Instantaneous

Most concoctions, maneuvers, and spells are instantaneous. They harm, heal, create, or alter a creature or an object in a way that can’t be dispelled, because their effects exists only for an instant.

Concentration

Some spells require you to maintain concentration in order to keep their magic active. If you lose concentration, such a spell ends.

If a spell must be maintained with concentration, that fact appears on its entry, and the spell specifies how long it can be concentrated on. The concentration can be ended at any time (no action required).

Normal activity, such as moving and attacking, doesn’t interfere with concentration. The following factors can break concentration:

  • Casting another spell that requires concentration. A creature loses concentration on a spell if it casts another spell that requires concentration. A creature can’t concentrate on two spells at once.
  • Taking damage. Whenever a creature who is concentrating takes damage, it must make a Will saving throw to maintain its concentration. The DC equals 10 or half the damage it takes, whichever number is higher. If it takes damage from multiple sources, such as an arrow and a dragon’s breath, it makes a separate saving throw for each source of damage.
  • Being incapacitated or killed. A creature loses concentration on a spell if it is incapacitated or if it dies.

The GM might also decide that certain environmental phenomena, such as a wave crashing over a creature while it is on a storm-tossed ship, require it to succeed on a DC 10 Will saving throw to maintain concentration on a spell.

Unstable

Some concoctions are made with unstable mixtures. If a concoction is unstable, that fact appears on its entry. The strange ingredients used in creating unstable concoctions can result in unpredictable interactions. A creature can only create one unstable concoction at a time. If the creature creates another unstable concoction before the previous unstable concoction is drunk or used, the previous unstable concoction becomes inert.

If multiple unstable concoctions are applied to an object, both effects end. If a creature consumes another unstable concoction before the effects of an existing unstable concoction expire, the creature must make a Fortitude saving throws against the highest alchemical save DC. On a failed save, both effects end and the creature takes 1d6 poison damage for each catalyst used on both concoctions and is poisoned for 1 minute. A poisoned creature can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success. On a successful save, the original effect ends, but the new effect persists.

A creature can choose to purge its stomach contents as an action to end the effects of an unstable concoction.

Targets

A typical concoction, maneuver, or spell requires you to pick one or more targets to be affected by the concoction, maneuver, or spell’s effect or magic. A concoction, maneuver, or spell’s description tells you whether the concoction, maneuver, or spell targets creatures, objects, or a point of origin for an area of effect (described below).

Unless a spell has a perceptible effect, a creature might not know it was targeted by a spell at all. An effect like crackling lightning is obvious, but a more subtle effect, such as an attempt to read a creature’s thoughts, typically goes unnoticed, unless a spell says otherwise.

A clear path to the target

To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can’t be behind total cover.

If you place an area of effect at a point that you can’t see and an obstruction, such as a wall, is between you and that point, the point of origin comes into being on the near side of that obstruction.

Targeting yourself

If a concoction, maneuver, or spell targets a creature of your choice, you can choose yourself, unless the creature must be hostile or specifically a creature other than you. If you are in the area of effect of a concoction, maneuver, or spell you use, you can target yourself.

Areas of effect

Some concoctions, maneuvers, and spells cover an area, allowing them to affect multiple creatures at once.

A concoction, maneuver, or spell’s description specifies its area of effect, which typically has one of six different shapes: cone, cube, cylinder, line, sphere, or wall. Every area of effect has a point of origin, a location from which the concoction, maneuver, or spell starts or erupts. The rules for each shape specify how you position its point of origin. Typically, a point of origin is a point in space, but some concoctions, maneuvers, and spells have an area whose origin is a creature or an object.

A concoction, maneuver, or spell’s effect expands in straight lines from the point of origin. If no unblocked straight line extends from the point of origin to a location within the area of effect, that location isn’t included in the concoction, maneuver, or spell’s area. To block one of these imaginary lines, an obstruction must provide total cover.

Cone

A cone extends in a direction you choose from its point of origin. A cone’s width at a given point along its length is equal to that point’s distance from the point of origin. A cone’s area of effect specifies its maximum length. A cone’s length, unless otherwise specified, is up to 2 meters for each mana or stamina expended.

A cone’s point of origin is not included in the cone’s area of effect, unless you decide otherwise.

Cube

You select a cube’s point of origin, which lies anywhere on a face of the cubic effect. The cube’s size is expressed as the length of each side. A cube’s length, unless otherwise specified, is up to 2 meters for each mana or stamina expended.

A cube’s point of origin is not included in the cube’s area of effect, unless you decide otherwise.

Cylinder

A cylinder’s point of origin is the center of a circle of a particular radius. The circle must either be on the ground or at the height of the concoction, maneuver, or spell’s effect. The energy in a cylinder expands in straight lines from the point of origin to the perimeter of the circle, forming the base of the cylinder. The concoction, maneuver, or spell’s effect then shoots up from the base or down from the top, to a distance equal to the height of the cylinder. A cylinder’s area, unless otherwise specified, is up to 1 meter radius and up to 2 meters high for each mana or stamina expended.

A cylinder’s point of origin is included in the cylinder’s area of effect.

Line

A line extends from its point of origin in a straight path up to its length and covers an area defined by its width. A line’s length, unless otherwise specified, is up to 3 meters for each mana or stamina expended.

A line’s point of origin is not included in the line’s area of effect, unless you decide otherwise.

Sphere

You select a sphere’s point of origin, and the sphere extends outward from that point. A sphere that extends outward from you uses your space as the point of origin. The sphere’s size is expressed as a radius in meters that extends from the point or space. A sphere’s area, unless otherwise specified, is up to 1 meter radius for each mana expended.

A sphere’s point of origin is included in the sphere’s area of effect.

Wall

A wall extends from its point of origin in a straight path up to its length and covers an area defined by its width and height. A wall is made of a number of panels for each mana expended. Each panel, unless otherwise specified, is up to 3 meters long, 2 meters high, and 30 centimeters thick.

Alternatively a wall can be shaped as a ringed wall up to 2 meters in diameter, 2 meters high, and 30 centimeters thick for each mana expended.

Alternatively a wall can be shaped as a domed sphere.

A wall’s point of origin is not included in the wall’s area of effect, unless you decide otherwise.

1 catalyst/stamina die/mana2 catalysts/stamina dice/mana3 catalysts/stamina dice/mana4 catalysts/stamina dice/mana5 catalysts/stamina dice/mana
Cone3 meters long5 meters long10 meters long10 meters long20 meters long
Cylinder1-meter-radius, 3 meters high2-meter-radius, 6 meters high3-meter-radius, 9 meters high4-meter-radius, 12 meters high5-meter-radius, 15 meters high
Line5 meters long, 1-meter wide5 meters long, 2-meter wide10 meters long, 2-meter wide10 meters long, 2-meter wide20 meters long, 2-meter wide
Sphere1-meter-radius2-meter-radius3-meter-radius4-meter-radius5-meter-radius
Wall5 meters long, 2 meters high, 30 centimeters thick5 meters long, 4 meters high, 60 centimeters thick10 meters long, 6 meters high, 90 centimeters thick10 meters long, 8 meters high, 120 centimeters thick20 meters long, 10 meters high, 150 centimeters thick

Saving throws

Some concoctions, maneuvers, and spells specify that a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of its effects. The concoction, maneuver, or spell specifies the saving throw that the target uses and what happens on a success or failure.

The DC to resist one of your concoctions equals 8 + your Intelligence + your proficiency bonus + any special modifiers.

The DC to resist one of your maneuvers equals 8 + your Strength or Dexterity (your choice) + your proficiency bonus + any special modifiers.

The DC to resist one of your spells equals 8 + your spellcasting ability + your proficiency bonus + any special modifiers.

Attack rolls

Some concoctions, maneuvers, and spells require the user to make an attack roll to determine whether the concoction, maneuver, or spell hits the intended target.

Your attack bonus with a maneuver attack equals your Strength or Dexterity (your choice) + your proficiency bonus.

Your attack bonus with a spell attack equals your spellcasting ability + your proficiency bonus.

Remember that you have disadvantage on a ranged attack roll if you are within 1 meter of a hostile creature that can see you and that isn’t incapacitated.

Combining effects

The effects of different concoctions, maneuvers, and spells add together while the durations of those concoctions, maneuvers, and spells overlap. The effects of similar concoctions, maneuvers, or spells used multiple times don’t combine. Instead, the most potent effect—such as the highest bonus—from those effects applies while their durations overlap.

For example, if two acolytes cast bless on the same target, that character gains the spell’s benefit only once; the character doesn’t get to roll two bonus dice.